One of the premium benefits of using Redux in collaboration with our React applications is the use of the Redux store. The Redux store stores our application’s state, essentially providing a snapshot of the application at any given moment. This may include whether a dropdown menu is clicked, whether a box is checked, whether a post is liked, etc. …

When building React applications, it definitely makes sense to use Redux. Redux provides a store in which we can house the state of our application. This is our Redux State, which is basically a snapshot of our application at any given moment. Whether a dropdown menu is clicked or not, which page we are currently on, the array of data being shown can all be part of the Redux State. While Redux state is more global and long term, React State, or state that exists within components, is typically more for short term goals like setting values for input fields.

The transition from creating a web site with exclusively Rails, and moving on to building a full stack application with both Rails and JavaScript is definitely an adjustment. Through the MVC conventions that a Rails only application has, we build out each page separately in the views folder. While this can be great for learning how to build a web application, and definitely helps in being able to learn through typing out an abundance of code, it is not how web applications are actually built out in every day life. …

One of the keys to creating a dynamic website is having nested routes. What would rottentomatoes.com be without nested routes? Just imagine if you could not select a specific movie and not see the reviews that were specific to that movie? Not much, right? Therefore, it is important that we nest our routes, set up the proper relationships in our models, and then set up our controllers with the proper arguments.

For this blog post, I’d like to discuss how we approach the Controllers, where the majority of the work is that the programmer will to do in order ensure…

Even though I officially started my Flatiron School education on November 9th. I consider it to have started around July 20th. I consider that to be my start date because that was when I started taking the lesson on learn.co . From those lessons, the First Mile, and then the CLI project, I had a hard time getting on a roll with coding. It was not that I did not like it, but for me, it was difficult to grasp certain concepts because there was no visual element that went along with it. I’m a comic artist, so I guess…

This week marked our cohort’s first project as Flatiron School students. To keep things succinct, we were tasked with creating an application that used information from a website. I chose to build an app that would read a ranked list of Nickelodeon shows. The article from Screenrant was listing the top 15 shows Nickelodeon had during the 2000s according to imdb. This was my first time building a repository and setting one up. Setting up the repository took some time and included some growing pains. However, by far the hardest part of building the app proved to be the scraping…

On November 9th, 2020, I started my journey at Flatiron School in the Software Engineering program. Coming from a background that includes Ice Hockey, Comic Book Art, and English, Software Engineering was definitely something that I thought I’d never be doing. While I always thought of myself as a modern person who certainly was not living in the Stone Age when it came to technology, Software Engineering just did not seem like something I would naturally gravitate towards. After graduating from college, I attended The Kubert School, which is a school for commercial art. One of the best attributes of…

Alex Waller

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